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Bavarian Crochet in Rows

Some time ago, I happened across a style of crochet I had never heard of before called Bavarian crochet. Legend has it that a mother and daughter of Bavarian descent created it, but no one knows for sure. In any case, it is a lovely textured stitch pattern.


Our example shows it worked in rows, but traditionally it is worked in the round. The resulting fabric is textured and thick, yet still drapes really well. It's perfect for all your fall projects!

I'm going to spend the next two weeks focusing on this unique stitch so we can go over how to work it in rows and how to work it in rounds. Today's lesson is Bavarian crochet in rows. Next week we'll cover Bavarian crochet in the round.

Note: This pattern has been updated to change "hdc" to "sc," which we feel results in a more closed square.

Bavarian Crochet in Rows


Special Stitches:
4-fptr cluster. Work a fptr over ea of the next 4 stitches, keeping the last loop of ea fptr on the hook. After the fourth fptr, yo and pull through all 5 loops on the hook. 4-fptr cluster is complete.

5-fptr cluster. Work a fptr over ea of the next 5 stitches, keeping the last loop of ea fptr on the hook. After the fifth fptr, yo and pull through all 6 loops on the hook. 5-fptr cluster is complete.

8-fptr cluster. Work a fptr over ea of the next 8 tr, keeping the last loop of ea fptr on the hook. After the eighth fptr, yo and pull through all 9 loops on the hook. 8-fptr cluster is complete.

Beg Ch: Multiple of 8 + 2.

Row 1. Sc in 2nd ch from hook, *skip 3 ch, (4 tr, ch 1, 4tr) in the next ch, skip 3 ch, sc in the next ch, rep from * across.

Change colors if desired.

Row 2. Ch 3; turn. 4-fptr cluster over next 4 tr, ch 4, sc in next ch-1 sp, *ch 3, 8-fptr cluster over next 8 tr, ch 4, sc in next ch-1 sp; rep from * across. Ch 3, 5-fptr cluster over next 5 st.

Row 3. Ch 4; turn. 4 tr in top of first cluster, sc in the next sc, *(4 tr, ch 1, 4 tr) in center of next cluster, sc in next sc; rep from * across. 5 tr in top of last cluster.

Change colors if desired.

Row 4. Ch 1; turn. Sc in first tr, *ch 3, 8-fptr cluster over next 8 tr, ch 4, sc in next ch-1 sp; rep from * across, ending last rep with a sc in last tr.

Row 5. Ch 1; turn. Sc in first sc, *(4 tr, ch 1, 4 tr) in center of first cluster, sc in next sc; rep from * across.

Change colors if desired.

Rep rows 2-5, changing colors after each odd row if desired.

Abbreviations
beg          beginning
ch          chain
ea          each
fptr          front-post treble crochet
rep          repeat
sc          single crochet
st          stitch
tr          treble crochet
yo          yarn over

47 comments:

  1. for row 2 what is 4-fptr cluster?

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    1. Doh! My apologies, I meant to include that in the beginning. I just added it above. Thanks for pointing that out!

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  2. row 4 is that supposed to read fphdc over 1st treb? I do not end with a hdc at end of row 3

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    1. Yes--you are correct! I just made the change above. Thank you!

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  3. You might want to check under your special stitches instructions.
    Each one contains "After the fourth fptr", I believe it changes with the amount of each one. Love your patterns.

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    1. Darn it--I thought I fixed that already! Thank you all for being my editors. ^_^

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  4. I might just have to use this stitch for a pattern..

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  5. Can you explain row 4 please? What does 4 fptr cluster over next (4tr, hdc, 4tr) mean? It sounds like you want a 9 fptr cluster repeated. Is that true?

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    1. Yes, you are correct! Thank you for catching that--I've made the change above.

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  6. May I ask what type of yarn and color you used in the photo above? It's beautiful! Thanks.

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    1. That was actually a hand-dyed wool found at a sheep festival. I liked the colors--reminded me of Kool-Aid. :)

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  7. Saw this technique featured at Annie's attic and can't afford it so I was thrilled to see you explain the stitch, thank you very much!

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    1. I'm with you, Jeanette. I occasionally purchase patterns, but this one was a little pricy. I always "google" what I see and like and it certainly worked in this instance because here I am. I'm not sure I'm advanced enough, but I think I'll practice this one and see what I come up with. It's really pretty. KK

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  8. Saw an afghan in a magazine for $57. This is so cool that you posted it. I'm going to go try it out. I've been looking for new stitches. You'd figure in 40 years of crocheting I would have seen this before.

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  9. ty for posting these amazing patterns and techniques!

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  10. beautful pattern, but am confused. Where do we repeat from in the second row after the 5 fptr cluster

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    1. The 5 fptr cluster isn't done until the end of the row. The part you repeat is "ch 4, 9-fptr cluster over next (4 tr, hdc, and 4 tr), ch 4, fphdc over next hdc."

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  11. What do you mean by multiple of 10+ 2

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    1. That means you can start with any number of chains as long as it is a multiple of 10 with 2 added on.

      Ex: 10 + 2 = 12, or 20 + 2 = 22, or 30 + 2 = 32.

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    2. Does adding 10 make it wider or longer? I want to make a lap blanket and have it about 3 to 4 feet wide... how many chains do you think I should start with?

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    3. Adding 10 makes it wider. As far as how many chains to start, it depends on what size hook you're using, what size yarn, etc. I'd recommend making a small square to see how wide each 10 chains are, and then calculate from there. :)

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  12. any idea how many stitches would be good for an afghan

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    1. That depends on how big a blanket you want to make, how thick your yarn is, and what size hook you're using. I'd recommend starting with a chain of 42 and working it for about 21 rows to make a gauge square. That way you can see how long each repetition is with your chosen yarn and hook, and you can decide how many chains to start out with from that.

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    2. A few years ago I took classes with Lily Chin and she even signed her book to me "Always Swatch!"

      Not swatching would be like going for Driver's License on the first day of learning to drive; or sewing a dress without measurements.

      I must admit that for some blankets, whether knit or crochet, I don't swatch. I've been lucky.

      When making an item of clothing, I will swatch.

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  13. The end of the 1st row when you chain 3 then turn to do 4fptr do you do it on the underneth or go over the row you have done

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    1. You do it on top of the row you just did, just as you would any other project worked in rows. :)

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  14. Can you please help me with the message i have just sent about where do i start the 2nd row after i have chained 3 i have done this stitch when you go round and i just loved it so now i want to do it straight but got stuck at the end of 1st row i did not get where to start the second row i will be very grateful for your help thankyou

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    1. Let me know if my previous reply didn't answer your question.

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  15. Can you please help me with row 2? I'm just doing a sample and did a 10+2 beginning chain. With that in mind, how can I fit all those fp stitches in one row?! Have you ever thought about posting a YouTube tutorial on this? I would love to be able to see how to do it. Thank you!

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    1. I would love to do YouTube tutorials, but there just aren't enough hours in the day to accommodate the toddler in the house and everything I'd like to do with this blog! Unfortunately the toddler takes priority. ;)

      Another way to think of the clusters is as 4 or 9 fptr worked together. It's basically a decrease stitch that is worked over several stitches.

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  16. How do you do a half double crochet?

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    1. Hi, Yvonne! Please see this tutorial: http://crochetkitten.blogspot.com/2007/03/half-double-crochet-hdc.html

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  17. At the end of Row 2, do you stitch into the hdc (first stitch from Row1)?

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    1. Actually, the 5-fptr cluster should be worked over the last 5 stitches of the row, which includes the hdc. Thank you for pointing that out. I have corrected it above.

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  18. I am trying this pattern and have a problem with row 2, after you do the first 9-fptr cluster it says to ch 4 and put the next stitch in the hdc. I don't have a hdc next. I have 5 of the 9 tr from row one next. Where am I going wrong? I put one tr in each of the (4tr - hdc - 4 tr) from the previous row to form the first 9-fptr cluster.

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    1. You're right--congrats on being the first to catch that. The next hdc goes in the next tr. :)

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  19. AnonymousMay 26, 2014

    Is this US stitch terminology? Making sure what you call a treble is what I know as a double treble. Thanks.

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  20. Ugh...So I've done Row 3 and started Row 4. But it says after the 9 fptr cluster to chain 4 and fphdc over the next hdc...but the next hdc is 6 stitches away...I'm confused.

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    1. Thanks for catching this; it should say "fphdc over next tr." I've made the correction. :)

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    2. great! I thought that might be it after I looked back at previous rows. Thanks for replying :)

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  21. Thank you--saw this on Knit and Crochet Now program but can no longer find the patterns from the show. Thank you so much---

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  22. Thank you so much for posting this pattern. I have begun and had to tear out a few times and start over, but finally got the hang of it. This is a beautiful pattern stitch to learn. Thank you again---

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  23. Thank you so much for the pattern. I have not seen it before, and I am going to enjoy playing with it. You are very generous.

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  24. Your pattern above states: Beg Ch: Multiple of 8 + 2. Is this not suppose to be 10 + 2????

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    1. When I first published this pattern, I had 4 chains between the sc and shell in the first row, which would result in a multiple of 10 + 2. I've since adjusted it to have 3 chains between the sc and shell, which I think results in a neater beginning edge. The change reduces the repeat to a multiple of 8 + 2.

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  25. Can you explain how to determine how much yarn is needed to make a throw using this stitch? Is there a formula for doing so?

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